A-LIb 529, Fragment 30

[The cataloguing project Musikalische Quellen (9.-15. Jahrhundert) in der Österreichischen Nationalbibliothek (Musical Sources (9th-15th Century) in the Austrian National Library), conducted by Alexander Rausch and Robert Klugseder at the Austrian Academy of Sciences, has made the Linz Fragments available online in high-resolution images. All links to the source including a preliminary inventory by Reinhard Strohm go to the homepage of this project. The image rights lie with Robert Klugseder who took the photos.]

Se une fois puis recouvrir ioie (Hayne van Ghizeghem)

The other side of Fragment 29 (see previous post)—Linz Fragment 30—is listed in Reinhard Strohm’s preliminary inventory to contain Hayne van Ghizeghem’s chanson “Se une fois”, and as would be expected, the edition of the music does not hold any big surprises.

The greater part of the cantus line, the entire tenor part and about a third of the bassus voice survive. And, just as Fragment 29, this fragment transmits a three voice composition. When considering the other folio within the Linz Fragments which has only three voice pieces (Fragments 43 & 44, see earlier posts), a pattern seems to emerge: It appears that the pieces were at least roughly sorted by number of voices.

Only a few features stand out in the Linz-transmission of Se une fois: In bar 19-20 of the edition two bassus notes are marked which are missing in the manuscript. This means that the version at hand would not have worked as written. Bar 38 is the only place where the Linz version differs noticeably from the Pixérécourt version and it is this place where parallel fifths occur as a consequence—something that was surely not intended.

For the following edition I took the transmission of the Pixérécourt Chansonnier (F-Pn, f. fr. 15123, fol. 149v-150) to fill in the gaps (in grey notation) of the Linz version.

"Se une fois" (Hayne van Ghizeghem)

“Se une fois” (Hayne van Ghizeghem)

Marc Lewon

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A-LIb 529, Fragment 29

[The cataloguing project Musikalische Quellen (9.-15. Jahrhundert) in der Österreichischen Nationalbibliothek (Musical Sources (9th-15th Century) in the Austrian National Library), conducted by Alexander Rausch and Robert Klugseder at the Austrian Academy of Sciences, has made the Linz Fragments available online in high-resolution images. All links to the source including a preliminary inventory by Reinhard Strohm go to the homepage of this project. The image rights lie with Robert Klugseder who took the photos.]

Domine martine(?)

Linz Fragment 29 features yet another textless piece, which in Reinhard Strohm’s preliminary inventory is listed under the title “Domine martine”, as a possible reading of the abbreviated incipit after the marking of the tenor voice.

The tenor line is almost complete and can easily be aligned with the end of the cantus line in a score. All the rest remains educated guesswork: No clefs, no key signatures survive and above this the fragmented bits of the contratenor voice are very difficult to insert into the proper places of the edition. The resulting edition, however, suggests that the piece was intended as a three voice composition. I assumed standard clefs for the surviving voices and introduced the accidental of one b-flat, which I believe solves the situation best.

"Domine martine" (?)

“Domine martine”(?)

PS: The piece has since been identified by David Fallows to be a transmission of “Dung plus amer”—for more information see the recent post: Linz Fragment 29 – Revisited.

Marc Lewon

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A-LIb 529, Fragment 19

[The cataloguing project Musikalische Quellen (9.-15. Jahrhundert) in der Österreichischen Nationalbibliothek (Musical Sources (9th-15th Century) in the Austrian National Library), conducted by Alexander Rausch and Robert Klugseder at the Austrian Academy of Sciences, has made the Linz Fragments available online in high-resolution images. All links to the source including a preliminary inventory by Reinhard Strohm go to the homepage of this project. The image rights lie with Robert Klugseder who took the photos.]

O fraw wie gar

Linz Fragment 19 contains another textless chanson with the enticing incipit “O fraw wie gar etc.” under the beginning of the cantus line. The fragment features a complete cantus-tenor set and about two-thirds of the altus voice. Due to the cropping and cut-outs from the page the latter voice is also fragmented within otherwise surviving parts of that line. The bassus voice is missing entirely. However, the edition given below still gives a good impression of the character of the composition, which is rich in imitations, harmonic progressions, and rhythmical diversity. The two lacunae in the altus voice are marked with asterisks as are those notes towards the end of the cantus voice which had already been corrected in the original. The same hand probably added “vel ibi” below the corrective markings, maybe with humorous intent, because the corrections are essential and not an option.

"O fraw wie gar"

“O fraw wie gar”

Marc Lewon

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The “Sound” of the Middle Ages – An Interview-Presentation

Wirtshausszene

The online-magazine of Vienna University “uni:view” has published an interview with the team of the “Musical Life” research project (Musikleben des Spätmittelalters in der Region Österreich (1340-1520) / Musical Life of the late Middle Ages in the Austrian Region (1340-1520): Birgit Lodes, Reinhard Strohm and Marc Lewon answered the detailed questions of Petra Schiefer about the approach and aims of the research project. The resulting interview (in German) embellished with depictions and sound clips as well as an excursion to Reinhard Strohm’s Balzan Prize Award Ceremony can be found online with uni:view, here: Der “Sound” des Mittelalters.

Giogrio Napolitano hands over the Balzan Prize to Reinhard Strohm on the 14th of November 2012

Giorgio Napolitano hands over the Balzan Prize to Reinhard Strohm on the 14th of November 2012

Marc Lewon

A-LIb 529, Fragment 28

[The cataloguing project Musikalische Quellen (9.-15. Jahrhundert) in der Österreichischen Nationalbibliothek (Musical Sources (9th-15th Century) in the Austrian National Library), conducted by Alexander Rausch and Robert Klugseder at the Austrian Academy of Sciences, has made the Linz Fragments available online in high-resolution images. All links to the source including a preliminary inventory by Reinhard Strohm (1984) go to the homepage of this project. The image rights lie with Robert Klugseder who took the photos.]

Argentum et aurum (Heinrich Isaac)

According to his preliminary inventory Reinhard Strohm was able to identify Linz Fragment 28 as a concordance to Isaac’s motet upon the chant-cantus firmus Argentum et aurum—a composition which can also be found in the Leopold and Apel Codices. Fragment 28 contains a bit more than the second half of the tenor voice and the first half of the altus for this composition. One noteworthy if minute difference between the Linz and the Leopold-Codex versions is that the dotted semibreves in Leopold tend to be divided into a semibreve plus minim motif in Linz, giving that version more of a rhythmic pulse. The following edition presents the missing voices in cue notes and the cut off bits of tenor and altus in grey notation all of it taken from the transmission in the Leopold Codex (Munich, Bayerische Staatsbibliothek, Mus. ms. 3454, fol. 72v-73, no. 50). As in the Leopold Codex also the transmission in Linz could well have featured a text underlay for the cantus voice.

Heinrich Isaac: "Argentum et aurum" - missing notation marked as cue and grey notation (taken from transmission in the Leopold Codex)

Heinrich Isaac: “Argentum et aurum” – missing notation marked as cue and grey notation (taken from transmission in the Leopold Codex)

Marc Lewon

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A-LIb 529, Fragment 27

[The cataloguing project Musikalische Quellen (9.-15. Jahrhundert) in der Österreichischen Nationalbibliothek (Musical Sources (9th-15th Century) in the Austrian National Library), conducted by Alexander Rausch and Robert Klugseder at the Austrian Academy of Sciences, has made the Linz Fragments available online in high-resolution images. All links to the source including a preliminary inventory by Reinhard Strohm go to the homepage of this project. The image rights lie with Robert Klugseder who took the photos.]

Le serviteur

Another Le serviteur setting was identified by Reinhard Strohm on Linz Fragment 27, for which he identified a concordance in Florence, Biblioteca Nazionale Centrale, MS Banco Rari 229 (formerly Magl.XIX 59) on fol. 279v-280 (no. 258). This setting uses only Dufay’s cantus and envelops it with a rich and active four voice counterpoint.

Since Fragment 27 seemed to have contained the entire notation for the two contratenor voices it can be assumed that the missing cantus and tenor used to be on the facing page of an opening, most likely the verso page, which would make Fragment 27 a recto page.

The notation missing due to the cropping of the page is coloured grey while the missing voices (cantus and tenor) are given in small notation. All emendations are taken from the complete transmission of the piece in Florence 229.

"Le serviteur" - missing music given in grey and small notation (taken from Florence 229)

“Le serviteur” – missing music given in grey and small notation (taken from Florence 229)

Marc Lewon

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A-LIb 529, Fragment 44

[The cataloguing project Musikalische Quellen (9.-15. Jahrhundert) in der Österreichischen Nationalbibliothek (Musical Sources (9th-15th Century) in the Austrian National Library), conducted by Alexander Rausch and Robert Klugseder at the Austrian Academy of Sciences, has made the Linz Fragments available online in high-resolution images. All links to the source including a preliminary inventory by Reinhard Strohm go to the homepage of this project. The image rights lie with Robert Klugseder who took the photos.]

[Glog 100]

As Strohm has pointed out in his preliminary inventory the composition on Linz Fragment 44 has a textless concordance in the Glogau Songbook (no. 100). The Linz transmission, however, only features a fragmentary A-part of the piece: It contains the ending of the cantus for the A-part, the entire tenor line of the A-part and the beginning of the contratenor of the A-part. The set-up suggests that the B-part was probably located on the facing page of an opening thus making Fragment 44 a verso side. This finding would also fit nicely with the notion that Fragment 43 used to contain a complete three voice Le serviteur setting without a bassus line. A fourth voice for that composition would most likely have required space on an adjacent page, which is not available in the proposed layout. It might also be interesting to note that both pieces, Le serviteur on Fragment 43 and [Glog100] are (most likely) three voice settings, while most of the other compositions in the Linz Fragments discussed so far have four voices (one exception being the J’ay pris amours on Fragment 9).

The following edition gives only the A-part of the textless piece with the missing notation taken from the transmission of the Glogau Songbook.

A-part of the textless, three voice composition on Fragment 44, missing notation (grey) taken from the concordance in Glog 100

A-part of the textless, three voice composition on Fragment 44, missing notation (grey) taken from the concordance in Glog 100

Marc Lewon

PS [8.5.2015]: Glog 100 can be found in an instrumental rendering on track 35 of the CD “Das Glogauer Liederbuch (The Glogau Song Book). Songs, Comic Tales and Tails”, Ensemble Dulce Melos, Sabine Lutzenberger (soprano), Martin Hummel (baritone), Marc Lewon (lute, direction), NAXOS 2012 with booklet notes by Reinhard Strohm.

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