A-LIb 529, Fragment 29 – Revisited

The publication of an edition of the surviving music on Linz Fragment 29 in an earlier post to this blog site has recently triggered an identification of the composition in question. Its abbreviated and hard to decipher incipit was up to then only loosely and tentatively transcribed as “Domine martine(?)”. David Fallows recognised the music and recently informed me of his identification. It is in fact the anonymous three-voice setting “D’ung plus amer” which can otherwise only be found in one concordant and likewise textless transmission in the Pixérécourt Chansonnier on fols. 117v-118r (no. 100). As the incipit suggests the piece is based on the famous Ockeghem (or Busnoys) chanson “D’ung aultre amer”, or as Clemens Goldberg puts it in his online edition of the Pixérécourt Chansonnier: “Das Stück ist eine Fantasie über Ockeghems Dun autre amer”, in that it “takes its first 9 semibreves from D’ung aultre amer and has the same cadence pitches.” (David Fallows: A Catalogue of Polyphonic Songs, 1415-1480, Oxford (University Press), 1999, p. 141). I would like to thank David Fallows for communicating his finding and for allowing me to announce the new identification.

D’ung plus amer—D’ung aultre amer

Linz Fragment 29 was photographed by Robert Klugseder for the cataloguing project Musikalische Quellen (9.-15. Jahrhundert) in der Österreichischen Nationalbibliothek (Musical Sources (9th-15th Century) in the Austrian National Library), conducted by Alexander Rausch and Robert Klugseder at the Austrian Academy of Sciences, and the image rights lie with the latter. The abbreviated incipit under the beginning of the tenor line, which was up to now deciphered as “Domine martine” could—with a bit of imagination—maybe be read as “Dun uatre mer” as a corrupted version of “Dung aultre amer”. This would fit the evidence of the Pixérécourt transmission where the tenor and contratenor voices are also marked “Dung aultre amer”, while only the cantus gives the incipit “Dung plus amer”. The surviving notation on Linz Fragment 29 features a few mistakes which are corrected according to the Pixérécourt transmission and marked in the edition below. The lacunas in Linz are likewise filled with material taken from Pixérécourt, here represented in grey notation.

"Dung plus amer" on Linz Fragment 29 - Identification by David Fallows, Edition by Marc Lewon (missing notation added from Pixérécourt Chansonnier and marked in grey).

“Dung plus amer” on Linz Fragment 29 – Identification by David Fallows, Edition by Marc Lewon (missing notation added from Pixérécourt Chansonnier and marked in grey).

Marc Lewon