A-Wn Cod 5455, fol. 180v (2) – An czal dý etc

A-Wn Cod 5455, fol. 180v (photographed by Robert Klugseder in the course of the cataloguing project Musikalische Quellen (9.-15. Jahrhundert) in der Österreichischen Nationalbibliothek) features four untexted melodies with German incipits, which were announced in an earlier entry to this blog site:

  1. Pärlein vnd mit
  2. An czal dý etc
  3. Paradys ich han gesúcht
  4. Maý etc

The second melody on this page (“An czal dý etc”) belongs to a family of pieces in a certain mode, which is typical to a number of secular songs by the Monk of Salzburg: This is a very characteristic C-tonality (related to the Phrygian mode) which exhibits distinctive melodic formulae involving jumps and “broken chords” (so to speak). These features can be found in such Monk-songs as “Hab aller czweifel aynen nit” (W34), “Untarnslaf tut den sumer wol” (W3), “Wier der fünfzehent an der schar” (W19) and especially “Ich het czu hannt geloket mir” (W48) as well as “Ich han gewart all dicz iar” (W53) with which the song at hand even shares a number phrases. This mode can be traced back as far as the Jenaer Liederhandschrift (D-Ju El.f.101) where several Spruchsang melodies feature similar melodic structures. The first phrase is likely intended as an untexted opening melisma, since the aforementioned cognates display very similar textless opening phrases.

Second melody on A-Wn cod 5455, fol. 180v: "An czal dý etc", reproduced with the kind permission of the ÖNB Vienna (photo ©Robert Klugseder).

Second melody on A-Wn cod 5455, fol. 180v: “An czal dý etc”, reproduced with the kind permission of the ÖNB Vienna (photo ©Robert Klugseder).

I am certain that a concordance for this melody will be found in the nearer future:

Transcription of "An czal dý etc" - a melody in typical German C-tonality.

Transcription of “An czal dý etc” – a melody in typical German C-tonality.

Marc Lewon

 [2015-02-28] PS: The concordance has been found and is rather obvious: It is the piece known as “Czaldy waldy” from two Prague manuscripts (CZ-Pu XVII.F.9 & CZ-Pu XIV.D.23), only the first of which gives the title as an incipit. Many thanks go to Lenka Hlávková for pointing out this connection. See the blog post dedicated to this find: A New Concordance for “Czaldy waldy”.

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